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    July 12th, 2018Decor BloggerDesign Tips & Tricks, Featured

    (Decor Amor) – Cooking equipment is the top cause of home fires, and the second leading cause of home fire deaths, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).

    “Considered to be one of the more preventable types of fires, kitchen fires can be avoided by following a few common-sense guidelines,” says Tarsila Wey, director of marketing at First Alert. “Home safety experts recommend having at least one fire extinguishing product conveniently located in the kitchen, as well as on every level of the home and in the garage.”

    Be prepared to fight the small flames by following the below tips to stay safe in the kitchen.

    Properly equip your home. Keep your family and house safe by ensuring that functioning smoke alarms are installed throughout your home. The NFPA recommends one alarm on every floor, including the basement, and inside every bedroom. In addition, install smoke alarms at least 10 feet from cooking appliances to minimize false alarms. All alarms should be tested monthly, and for alarms without 10-year batteries, replace the batteries every six months.

    Keep an eye on your food. Staying in the kitchen while cooking is key to preventing oven or stovetop fires. Whether you’re simmering, baking, boiling or roasting, check on your food regularly. If you need a reminder that the oven or stove is on, just set a timer. Be aware that fires can happen fast, so if you must leave the kitchen — even for a short period of time — turn off the stove.

    Clean your appliances. Keep all your appliances clean of grease and food debris that could potentially cause a fire. Clear the toaster of crumbs and wipe down the stovetop as needed. Ovens should be cleaned at least every three to six months.

    Clear off kitchen countertops. Keep your countertops clean and clear of flammable objects. Move items such as pot holders, wooden utensils, plastic bags, food packaging and paper towels away from the stove, oven or any other kitchen device that generates heat.

    Be prepared when disaster strikes. Over 70 percent of fire extinguisher owners say that they would not feel very comfortable actually operating one. Providing homeowners with a user-friendly, affordable solution, the First Alert Tundra Fire Extinguishing Spray features a lightweight spray-can design that has no pins or levers — making it easy to use. It can put out common household fires, including cooking oil, fabric, paper, wood and electrical fires. Tundra sprays four times longer than an average fire extinguisher and fits perfectly in your kitchen cabinet. Plus, it won’t damage your stove or countertop; simply wipe the area clean with a damp cloth.

    Having the necessary fire safety tools and knowledge, and talking with your family members about these safety precautions, can help prevent potentially fatal kitchen fires. To learn more tips and tricks, visit www.FirstAlert.com.

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    July 6th, 2018Decor BloggerDesign Tips & Tricks, Featured

    (Decor Amor) – Outdoor living season means backyard BBQs, yard games and relaxing with a good book or good friends. If you own a wood deck, however, it also means considerable time and money spent on seasonal maintenance and deck repairs.

    While wood decks are aesthetically pleasing, properly maintaining them requires regular stripping, sanding and staining. The process is labor-intensive, time-consuming, messy and costly — averaging between $540 and $1,050 each time, according to HomeAdvisor.com.

    Consider this: For the same time and energy you would spend maintaining and repairing those old wood boards, you could replace them with a deck made of structurally superior composite material — and never again have to worry about upkeep. As long as the structural framework of your existing deck is intact and in good condition, you are a candidate for deck resurfacing.

    “Resurfacing an aging or decaying wood deck with new composite decking is a doable DIY project that can be completed over the course of a weekend or two with just a little know-how and the help of a few friends,” explains Adam Zambanini, vice president of marketing for Trex Company. “You get a brand-new deck for a lot less money than starting from scratch — and a lot less hassle through the years.”

    Designed for maximum durability and minimal maintenance, wood-alternative decking is resistant to fading, staining, scratching and mold and, unlike wood, requires no sanding, staining or sealing. Just an occasional soap-and-water cleaning is all that is needed to retain a “like-new” appearance and durability for decades.

    Ready to resurface?

    Follow these simple steps to a new deck surface that you can spend less time maintaining and more time enjoying:

    Step 1: Examine the substructure

    Before removing any boards, check your deck’s foundation. Start from the ground up by examining the footings, posts and joists. Pay close attention to the condition of the wood. Soft wood indicates rot and should be replaced before proceeding. If the existing framing and substructure are sound, you’re good to go.

    Tip: To help ensure your substructure lasts as long as your new composite deck boards, use a protective tape, such as TrexProtect, to shield wooden joists and beams from moisture that can lead to rot and the loosening of deck screws and fasteners.

    Step 2: Remove old deck boards

    Remove any existing railing and begin prying up the nailed decking boards, leaving the substructure and framing in place. Start from the outside and move toward the house so you have a solid, safe platform from which to work.

    Step 3: Level it out

    To ensure a level surface for the new deck boards, make sure the joists are flat and even with one another. If any joists are bowed, you may need to plane or cut them.

    Step 4: Install new deck boards

    Begin laying out the new composite boards. Starting near the house, face screw the first board to the frame. Closely follow the instructions for spacing from the manufacturer’s installation guide. As you progress, check the spacing between the house and the deck boards to make sure they stay parallel with the house. Correct variations a little at a time over several rows to avoid large, tapered gaps.

    Step 5: Complete with railing

    Measure for each post location, and cut placement holes with a jigsaw. Then, drop the posts into the holes and bolt them securely. Slide sleeves over the posts and assemble railing and balusters per the installation guide. Finish off by adding your choice of decorative elements, such as post caps and top rail caps.

    For more guidance on deck resurfacing, watch a step-by-step video from Trex at https://youtu.be/ZI8CYwI0MYM.

  • scissors
    July 3rd, 2018Decor BloggerDesign Tips & Tricks, Featured

    (Decor Amor) – American household demographics constantly change. With kids grown and moved out, many adults are considering remodeling to meet their future needs. This has inspired the idea of aging in place, meaning the desire to have a high quality of life in your home as you get older. In the United States, it’s a desire shared by many.

    According to the AARP, 87 percent of adults age 65 and older want to stay in their current home and community as they age. Furthermore, among people age 50 to 64, 71 percent of people want to age in place. The desire to age in place typically requires making thoughtful updates to a home to accommodate senior needs.

    Multigenerational households are also changing for older family members. Sometimes it’s necessary to have elderly relatives move in to your home for them to thrive. Adult children will opt to make remodeling updates so spaces are safe, comfortable and accessible for all.

    Whether you’re remodeling for yourself or a family member, there are many things to consider. Making changes where it matters most will help transform the household into a secure space for aging adults.

    Single-story living

    Having all rooms on a single story is the ideal layout for senior living. That means the bedroom, bathroom and kitchen can be accessed without having to travel to different levels of the home. Keep in mind, open-concept designs can be beneficial for seniors, but if you are updating hallways, make sure they are at least 36 inches wide for easy maneuverability.

    Bathroom additions

    Adding a bathroom to facilitate single-story living might seem impossible if you don’t have existing drainage. However, it is feasible and doesn’t require costly demolition. With Saniflo, you can add a complete bathroom where no drainage existed before, thanks to above-floor plumbing features like a macerating toilet and drain pumps. The Saniaccess2 is ideal for powder rooms and the Saniaccess3 is a smart choice for full baths.

    Bathroom safety

    Bathrooms are one of the most dangerous rooms in a home, particularly for those age 65 and older who are more prone to falls. When remodeling, add wall supports such as grab bars in the bath, shower and by the toilet. For showers, a fold-down seat and handheld showerhead can add comfort. A wall-hung sink adds space below and can make it easier to clean and move around. Avoid using rugs and instead install slip-resistant flooring.

    Kitchen additions

    Redesigning your home with a mother-in-law suite for aging relatives can be a nice way to provide them with everything they need. It will also ensure that everyone has their desired privacy in the home. Again, don’t let drainage limit your remodel plans. Add a modest kitchen setup using Saniflo Sanivite technology. It will pump wastewater away from a variety of sources, such as a kitchen sink, laundry sink and washing machine. Learn more at go.saniflo.com.

    Ramps and stairs

    There may be spaces in a home where you can’t avoid installing a ramp or stairs. The entryway is one such area. For stairways, install handrails on both sides and add contrast strips to prevent tripping and stumbling hazards. For ramps, the National Association of Home Builders recommends slopes no greater than 1-inch rise for each 12 inches in length, a 2-inch curb for safety and a 5-foot landing at the entrance. All ramps or stairs should have adequate lighting for easy visibility.

    Ample lighting

    As vision decreases with age, lighting becomes a critical element throughout a home. Consider adding windows and skylights for plenty of natural light. Swap in brighter bulbs and add adjustable features that allow you to customize settings for frequently used spaces. Finally, add motion lights to hallways and bathrooms for easy evening use. Hard-wired lights are preferred to plug-in options, but if you must have cords, make sure they are hidden or secured to the ground.

    When aging in place matters to you or your family members, these guidelines can help you remodel wisely. Smart updates will help you enjoy your home today and thrive in the future.

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